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What are the different types of diabetes?

 

Diabetes is a group of diseases in which the body does not produce enough or no insulin, does not use the insulin produced properly, or shows a combination of the two. When any of these things occur, the body is unable to take blood sugar into the cells. This raises blood sugar levels.

Glucose is one of the most important sources of energy in your blood. Insulin deficiency or insulin resistance causes the formation of sugar in your blood. This can cause a lot of health problems.

There are three main types of diabetes:

  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Gestational diabetes

What are the causes of diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes

 

Type 1 diabetes is thought to be autoimmune. This means that your immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys beta cells in your pancreas that produces insulin. The loss is permanent.

 

It’s not clear what the attacks are. There can be both genetic and environmental reasons. Lifestyle factors are not considered to play a role.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes begins as a resistance to insulin. This means that your body cannot use insulin effectively. Which stimulates your pancreas to produce more insulin until it can sustain more demand. Insulin production decreases, leading to high blood sugar.

 

The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is not known. Contributing factors may include:

 

  • Genetics
  • Lack of exercise
  • To be loaded

There may be other health factors as well as environmental causes.

Gestational diabetes

Diabetes is caused by the hormone that blocks insulin during pregnancy. This type of diabetes only occurs during pregnancy.

What are the symptoms?

Common symptoms of diabetes include:

 

  • Excessive thirst and hunger
  • Frequent urination
  • Sleepiness or fatigue
  • Dry, itchy skin
  • Blurred vision
  • Slow healing wounds

Type 2 diabetes can cause dark patches on the skin layers in your armpits and neck. Since diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is often time consuming, you may experience symptoms such as pain or numbness in your legs at the time of diagnosis.

Type 1 diabetes often develops rapidly and can cause symptoms such as weight loss or a condition called diabetes ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when you have high blood sugar, but whether or not your body has low insulin levels.

 

Symptoms of both types of diabetes can appear at any age, but most commonly occur in type 1 children and adolescents. Type 2 is found in people over the age of 45. But younger people are increasingly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to their sedentary lifestyle and weight gain.

How common is diabetes?

About 30 30.3 million Trusted Source individuals in the United States have diabetes. About 1 in 5 of 10 Trusted Source sources have type 1 diabetes, while 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes.

The latest data shows that in 2015, 1.5 million adult traded sources were newly diagnosed. Another 84.1 million are thought to have a private database. But many people do not know that they have this condition.

Prebiotics are when your blood glucose should be higher, but not enough to cause diabetes.

If you have a family history of the disease, you are more likely to be diabetic.

Other risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:

 

  • Sitting Lifestyle
  • To be loaded
  • Pregnant diabetes or prediabetes

What are the potential complications?

Diabetes complications usually develop over time. Poorly controlling blood sugar levels increases the risk of serious complications that can become fatal. Chronic complications include:

 

  • Vessel disease, heart attack or stroke
  • Eye problems, called retinopathy
  • Infection or skin conditions
  • Nerve damage, or neuropathy
  • Kidney damage, or nephropathy
  • Erosion due to neuropathy or vessel disease

Type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, especially if your blood sugar is not well controlled.

Complications in pregnancy

High blood sugar levels during pregnancy can harm mothers and babies, increasing their risk:

 

  • High blood pressure
  • of preeclampsia
  • Abortion or stillbirth
  • Congenital defects

How are different types of diabetes treated?

It does not matter what type of diabetes you have, you will need to work with your doctor to control it.

The main objective is to keep blood glucose levels within your target range. Your doctor will tell you what your target range should be. The goals for diabetes, age and the presence of complications vary.

If you have gestational diabetes, your blood sugar goals will be lower than those of other types of diabetes.

Physical activity isĀ  necessary part of diabetes management. Ask your doctor how many minutes you should devote to aerobic exercise per week. Diet is also essential for good control. You will also need to monitor your blood pressure and cholesterol.

Treating type 1

All individuals with type 1 diabetes need insulin to survive because the damage to the pancreas is permanent. Different types of insulin are available at different times of start, peak, and duration.

Insulin is injected just below the skin. Your doctor will tell you how to inject and rotate the injection sites. You can also use an insulin pump, a device worn outside your body that can be programmed to release a specific dose. There are now regular blood glucose monitors that check your diabetes in 24 days.

You need to monitor your blood sugar level daily. If necessary, you may also need to take medication to control cholesterol, hypertension, or other complications.

Treating type 2

Type 2 diabetes is used in diet and exercise, and a variety of medicines can be found to help control blood sugar. The first line of the drug is usually metformin (glutamate, glucophage, formate, rheumatite). This medicine helps your body use insulin more effectively. If metformin does not work, your doctor may prescribe other medicines or try something different.

You need to monitor your blood sugar level. You may also need medications to control blood pressure and cholesterol.

Prevention

Type 2 diabetes is used in diet and exercise, and a variety of medicines can be found to help control blood sugar. The first line of the drug is usually metformin (glutamate, glucophage, formate, rheumatite). This medicine helps your body use insulin more effectively. If metformin does not work, your doctor may prescribe other medicines or try something different.

You need to monitor your blood sugar level. You may also need medications to control blood pressure and cholesterol.

Outlook

There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. It requires the management of lifelong ailments. But with regular monitoring and treatment adherence, you may be able to avoid more serious illness complications.

If you work closely with your doctor and make good lifestyle choices, type 2 diabetes can often be successfully managed.

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of this will be resolved after your baby is born (although you are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life).

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